Thursday, 22 March 2012

Schrödinger Proposes a bill

One can even set up quite ridiculous cases.

The future NHS is penned up in a red box,

Along with the following device

(Which must be secured against direct interference by the NHS):

In a Tory proposal, there’s a so called tiny bit,

A radical restructure from the top,

So small that perhaps in the course of the parliament,

The course of its health bill passes, but also,

With equal probability, perhaps not;

If it happens, their partners discharge their duty,

And through a relay releases amendments

That transforms a small clause in the bill.

If one has left this entire system to itself for a term,

One could say that the NHS still lives

If meanwhile no bill is passed.

The politics of the entire system would

Express this by a small red box by George

Having in it the living and dead NHS

(Pardon the expression) mixed or smeared out in equal parts.

It is typical of these cases that an indeterminacy

Originally restricted to the political domain

Becomes transformed into macroscopic bureaucracy,

Which can then be resolved by direct observation.

That prevents us from so naively accepting as valid

A "blurred model" for representing reality.

In itself, it would not embody anything unclear or contradictory.

There is a difference between a shaky or out-of-focus bill

And a snapshot of clouded or foggy judgements.

So David could proclaim “By George…

That is a humdinger of a bill!”

“The appliance of Science” Old Nick replies.
"The devils in the detail!"

© Mike Richardson

Health reforms - where they stand
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Mike lived in Pembrokeshire. After University in West Wales, he left for City Life. He still hankers after the country that has inspired his writing.

4 comments:

  1. I don't get your h-care system, but I like the "humdinger" line!

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  2. I am not in that particular NHS, so it is all a bit unclear to me, but in principle, whenever they do it is still about how much money goes into the scheme. Fiddling with the rules rarely changes the quality of, or access to care.

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  3. Great verse Mike.

    Stafford ~ Sadly fiddling with the rules will surely change the quality of, or access to care. The NHS is effectively dying...

    Anna :o]

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  4. Stafford
    When I read "I am not in that particular NHS" I was beginning to think that you had really grasped the whole schroedinger thing including parallel universes! What an amusing thought! Perhaps you did and like the experiment life is full of ambiguity. As long as they remove the right leg when amputating (another ambiguity). :-)

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